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Wednesday, June 3, 2015

Video short film "Indigenous Reflections on Christianity" by Sacred Land Film Project





Watch "Indigenous Reflections on Christianity" by Sacred Land Film Project
(13 minutes, May 26, 2015) What are the ecological implications of Christianity? There’s a story that has has played out all over the world. First come the missionaries doing good. Indigenous communities split apart and connections to land, ancestors and spirits of place weaken—not everywhere, but almost everywhere. Then come, in some order or another, government agents, land speculators, mining companies, the military. Some get rich. Some feel saved. But land and culture suffer. Sacred places are targeted at the same time as political and spiritual leaders are taken down. The connections have to be weakened for the colonizer to win. We all know about this history but we rarely talk about it in any depth, or assess the relationship to our planet’s environmental crisis. And we rarely listen to what indigenous historians have to say about this—their analysis. Here it is.

Onondaga Faithkeeper Oren Lyons, Native Hawaiian historian Davianna McGregor, Australian Aboriginal elder and former Catholic priest Patrick Dodson, and Anishinaabe author and activist Winona LaDuke offer their insights into the history of Christianity in relation to indigenous peoples and ecosystems around the world.

While filming Standing on Sacred Ground: Fire and Ice—in both Ethiopia and Peru—our cameras captured scenes of Christian harassment of indigenous ceremonies on sacred land. These interview bites in this YouTube clip are outtakes from some of the profound interviews we were fortunate to conduct during the making of Standing on Sacred Ground. While our four-hour series does include key sound bites that you will hear in these longer comments, some important thought sequences take a while to unfold. This needs to be a long, long conversation—so let’s have it!"

Website link for more story
Video Link 

Related Article: New York Times "Selling Off Apache Holy Land"

Related Article: NYT Op-Ed "Oak Flat Apache Land Grab ‘an Impressive New Low" (by Indian Country Today Media Network staff)


Video short TED Talk by Elora Hardy "Magical Houses, Made of Bamboo" (Green Village and Green School)





Watch TED Talk ""Elora Hardy: Magical Houses, Made of Bamboo" (2015, 10 minutes) You've never seen buildings like this. The stunning bamboo homes built by Elora Hardy and her team in Bali twist, curve and surprise at every turn. They defy convention because the bamboo itself is so enigmatic. No two poles of bamboo are alike, so every home, bridge and bathroom is exquisitely unique. In this beautiful, immersive talk, she shares the potential of bamboo, as both a sustainable resource and a spark for the imagination. "We have had to invent our own rules," she says.
  Website "Green Village" and "Green School"

Green Village film on vimeo

John Hardy's Ted Talk about the "Green School"

Elora Hardy's INK Talk "Building a Sustainable Future"